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Wednesday, October 30, 2013

For Today's Radio Show

Lots going on today with my co-host, Jim Murphy.  Either live during the show (1-2p, EST, WARL 1320 and then on renewablenow.biz where you can find all of our radio segments), or taped right after, we will be talking to Miles Grant, from the National Wildlife Federation about this fun story that hits in time for Halloween, 2013.  Enjoy and tune in:



Our good friends at the National Wildlife Federation sent us a fun story for this Halloween season, one that might even help continue to bring young people (and some adults) become a bit more aware of one of our great natural resources, wildlife.

With AMC’s The Walking Dead’s fourth season debuting to a record audience of 14 million viewers, the National Wildlife Federation’s David Mizejewski decided to take a closer look at what would be the zombie’s toughest opponent, but one that’s virtually ignored on the show: America’s wildlife. If the show included Mother Nature in its cast, how do you think she would fare? Well according to Dave, it's no contest.

Most zombies would meet their end not at the hands of Daryl’s crossbow but in the mouths of wildlife, from the biggest bear to the most microscopic bacteria. 

North America's large mammal predators would be more than a match for zombies. We have two bear species, brown (or grizzly) and black bears. Male brown bears can weigh in at 1,000 pounds. They are not afraid of humans. They can deliver a bite of 1200 pounds per square inch and have long, sharp claws designed to rip open logs and flip boulders in search of insects and other small critters to eat. They would easily tear apart rotting zombie flesh.  Black bears are much smaller and typically run from humans, but even a black bear, when approached or cornered, would make short work of a zombie. Both bear species have an incredible sense of smell and both love to eat carrion, so even if zombies didn't approach them, the bears eventually would learn that these walking bags of flesh make good eating.
- See more at: http://renewablenow.biz/main.html#sthash.0sXwKzbF.dpuf

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